Japanese Canadian Internment Camps Essay

Japanese Canadian Internment Camps Essay-52
They based part of their appeal on the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, saying: "As a visible minority that has experienced legalized repression under the War Measures Act, we urge the Government of Canada to take such steps as are necessary to ensure that Canadians are never again subjected to such injustices.

They based part of their appeal on the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, saying: "As a visible minority that has experienced legalized repression under the War Measures Act, we urge the Government of Canada to take such steps as are necessary to ensure that Canadians are never again subjected to such injustices.

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Lena Hayakawa After the war, Hayakawa’s family moved to Whitemouth, Manitoba and tried to begin anew. It was only on April 1, 1949 that Japanese Canadians were again allowed to move freely across Canada.

Before that date, the community had begun to organize.

the bathroom and everything was all outside and there was no bathtub. In fact, Japanese Canadians were banned from returning to B. after the War ended, and about 4,000 were exiled to Japan – a war-ravaged country many of them had never seen.

In the wintertime, my mother had to bring the snow in the house and melt it. To make matters even worse, Japanese Canadians lost almost all their property, with little to no compensation – the government had sold it off during the War, and used the proceeds to finance the internment.

They wanted to ensure that no one would have their rights violated in this way ever again.

In November of 1984, the NAJC submitted a brief entitled “Democracy Betrayed: The Case for Redress,” calling on the federal government to redress the injustices of the 1940s.

On September 22, 1988, then-Prime Minister Brian Mulroney formally apologized in the House of Commons to all Japanese Canadians.

In addition to the apology, the government also offered ,000 to each individual directly affected by the internment, the creation of a community fund, pardons for those who had been wrongfully imprisoned during the War, and Canadian citizenship for Japanese Canadians and their descendants who had been wrongfully deported to Japan at the War’s end.

She knows that when we are silent about human rights violations, it is easier for them to disappear from history.

When one violation is erased from our past, it makes it easier to deny others. She explained how redress helped her and many others to open up about their experience, so that future generations would understand what happened right here in Canada.

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